Iraq War: Everything You Need to Know about!

The Iraq war started on March 19, 2003. Currently, it is the longest military clash of United States other than the Vietnam War. The Iraq war has taken somewhere in the range of 90,000 Iraqi lives. Besides, around 4,298 coalition troops has been died, among them, there are about 4,000 Americans. Also, the American citizens or taxpayers have paid nearly $700 billion and this war may cost up to $2 trillion if the war continues for another five years.

Significant Events of the war

  • On March 2003, about 300,000 American and British troops had attacked Iraq. Almost all the members from the U.N. have opposed the war. On May 1, the then President of US Bush declared victory over Iraq. But, there was violence against American soldiers and Iraqis who supported the war. Because of vulnerable security, robbers figure out how to take invaluable archeological relics from the National Museum in Baghdad. And a huge amount of explosives was stolen from an Iraqi weapons facility. The Iraqi Army had broken down and members from Saddam’s ruling Baath party were restricted from taking part in the government activities. In December, Saddam was found in a little subversive hideout.

 

  • In 2004, an interim constitution was approved. There were photos revealed abusing Iraqi detainees by American fighters in the Abu Ghraib jail. A furious adversary of American inclusion in Iraq, Shiite minister Moktada al-Sadr, drove an uprising against U.S. troops. As a result, the terrorist attacks occurred in every day.

 

  • In 2005, the first election in Iraq took place in over 50 years. The people of Iraq picked a National Assembly. In that election, all most all Sunnis decline to vote, and Shiites win a greater part of the vote. The “Bringing down Street Memo” surfaces – providing details regarding a 2002 meeting, the head of British Intelligence expresses that President Bush needed to uproot Saddam, and that the Bush administration influenced the evidence to start an invasion. Saddam Hussein goes on trial for wrongdoings against humankind.

 

  • In 2006, Nouri al-Maliki was elected as Prime Minister of Iraq. Abu Musab al Zarqawi, a pioneer of “Al Qaeda in Iraq,” was executed by American troops. Saddam Hussein is executed as well.

 

  • In 2007, on the insistence of General David Petraeus, who was the commander of U.S. forces in Iraq, US President Bush had provided an additional 30,000 troops to Iraq. “The surge” means to smother the aggression and help the rival groups to achieve a political settlement. The ongoing brutality of “al-Qaeda in Iraq” triggered a backfire, which is known as the Sunni Awakening. Almost 80,000 previous Sunni agitators betray Al-Qaeda and backed the new government.

 

  • 2008 The Iraqi government calls for the removal of U.S. troops by 2011.

 

  • In February 2009, newly elected U.S. President Barack Obama declared that American battle troops will leave Iraq by August 2010. However, around 50,000 soldiers will stay for advising and training the Iraqi security forces and thus, they will help with intelligence-gathering.

 

  • In August 2010, US President Obama declared that the American battle mission in Iraq has been finished.

Numbers involved with Iraq War

  • American soldiers murdered in Iraq: 4,487
  • American soldiers injured in Iraq: 32,226
  • Dollars spent (or affirmed to be spent) on the war, through 9/10: about $900 billion
  • Iraqi police and soldiers murdered: 9,381
  • Iraqi civilians murdered: assessments range from 50,000 to 600,000
  • Iraqi guerrillas slaughtered: around 55,000
  • Iraqi refugees who have left their home: more than 2.1 million (about 7% of the aggregate population)
  • Iraqi refugees inside Iraq: more than 2.2 million starting 2007

How has the Iraq War changed the course of the lives of Iraq People?

As indicated by the International Committee of the Red Cross (in 2007), “Civilians endured the worst part of the persistent brutality and the poor security conditions disrupt the lives and jobs of millions. Consistently, many individuals were murdered and numerous were injured. Shootings, bombings, snatchings, murders, military operations and different types of savagery are compelling a large number of individuals to escape their homes and look for security somewhere else in Iraq or in neighboring nations.” As of 2007, 25% of Iraqi children experienced endless chronic malnutrition. 40% of professionals had escaped from the nation and a lot of homes had electricity for just a couple of hours a day (starting 2007). And just 1/3 of homes had sewer system facilities.