How can you qualify of Veteran Benefits?

Every time the Congress passes another veteran’s benefits law, it builds up a particular qualification criteria. With the end goal of the benefits, being a veteran is insufficient. Whether you meet all requirements or particular type of benefits, it always relies on several different factors:

  • The length of service
  • Where and when you served
  • The discharge characterization

Veteran benefits and length of service

Qualification or eligibility for most veteran’s benefits requires a particular length of military service. Look at the below table. As everything should be obvious, to meet all requirements for full Montgomery GI Bill instruction advantages, you need to serve for at least 36 months. With that in mind, you could fit the bill for VA handicap pay or VA therapeutic care with one and only day of active duty. Try not to get excited as for inability or restorative care; you need to meet a huge number of other eligibility criteria’s.

Veterans Benefits Basic Eligibility Criteria
Benefit Minimum Service Requirement Period of Service Discharge Characterization
VA healthcare Any Any Honorable, general, or VA determination
Military health insurance 20 years Any Honorable
VA pension 90 days active duty Before Sept. 7, 1980 Honorable, general, or VA determination
VA pension 2 years active duty On or after Sept. 7, 1980 Honorable, general, or VA determination
VA disability compensation Any Any Honorable, general, or VA determination
Military retirement 20 years Any Honorable
Military life insurance programs Any Any Honorable, general, or VA determination
Burial and memorial benefits Any Enlisted: Service on or before Sept. 7, 1980
Officers: Service on or before Oct. 16, 1981
Honorable, general, or VA determination
Burial and memorial benefits 24 months continuous active duty Enlisted: Service after Sep. 7, 1980
Officers: Service after Oct. 16, 1981
Honorable, general, or VA determination
Active-Duty GI Bill 36 months active duty Any Honorable
Reserve GI Bill After initial training Any N/A
21st Century GI Bill 90 days continuous active duty or 6 months total active duty After Sept. 11, 2001 Honorable
Vocational training for disabled veterans Any Any Honorable, general, or VA determination
Veterans job preference 1 day Any Honorable, general, or VA determination
Veterans small-business loans Any Any Honorable general, or VA determination
VA Home Loan Program 90 days active duty Sept. 16, 1940, to July 25, 1947; or June 27, 1950, to Jan. 31, 1955; or Aug. 5, 1964, to May 7, 1975 Honorable, general, or VA determination
VA Home Loan Program 181 days continuous active duty Enlisted: July 26, 1947, to June 26, 1950; or Feb. 1, 1955, to Aug. 4, 1964; or May 8, 1955, to Sep;. 7, 1980
Officers: May 8, 1975 to Oct. 16, 1981
Honorable, general, or VA determination
VA Home Loan Program 24 months continuous active duty Enlisted: Sept. 7, 1980, to present
Officers: Oct. 16, 1981, to present
Honorable, general, or VA determination
VA Home Loan Program 6 years Guard/Reserve service Any Honorable
Homeless veterans programs Any Any Honorable, general, or VA determination
Military retirement homes 20 years Any Honorable
Military retirement homes (100% disabled) 1 day Any Honorable, general, or VA determination
Military shopping benefits 20 years or 100% disabled Any Honorable
Military travel benefits 20 years or 100% disabled Any Honorable

Note: The table shows basic eligibility criteria only. Source: www.dummies.com

Veteran’s benefits and where and when you served

It appears that Congress has not made things straightforward. Just to confuse things, where and when you served in the military can affect your qualification for specific veteran’s benefits. Take another glance at the table. In order to be fit for the bill of VA Home Loan Program, you have to have at least 90 days of active-duty service provided that you were deployed at the Vietnam War. In any case, Gulf War, you must have no less than 24 months of constant active-duty service to qualify. Also, a member from the National Guard or Reserves is required to have at least six years of Guard/Reserve service to qualify.

Veteran’s benefits and service discharges

It’s astounding as to how many people including the military people think that there are just two kinds of military discharges – honorable and dishonorable. But, actually the military discharges come in two different types –

  • Administrative: Administrative releases are approved by the higher authority, who is generally a high-rank officer.

 

  • Punitive: Punitive releases can be provided just by a military court-martial.

Both types have different segments too, some of which will influence your eligibility for veteran’s benefits. Essentially, if you got a dishonorable discharge, a dismissal from a general court-martial, a bad conduct discharge, you will not be eligible for veteran’s benefits program.

How the US Plans to Improve the Treatment of Recent Veterans Suffering from PTSD & TBI?

Several veterans coming back from war have encountered Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) side effects. Senator Gillibrand has an exclusive plan to reinforce observing and treatment for men and women at work and new veterans. This authoritative plan concentrates on getting the organizations at the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Veterans Administration (VA) to facilitate all the treatment more adequately. They have to work seamlessly to address the problems related to mental health treatment. And they need to work tirelessly to upgraded the screening procedure and make it accessible to mental health providers.

Stanford University study revealed that PTSD and other mental diseases can affect upwards of 35% of all veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In spite of everything, there remains much more work to do to offer quality treatment to the PTSD and TBI affected service members and veterans.

According to RAND Corporation data, around 8,000 new veterans from NYC suffer from PSTD and more than 7,000 suffer from TBI. Also, over 4,000 suffer from both. The corporation also states that 20% of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans encounter PTSD, 19% suffer from TBI, and 75% is affected by both problems. Senator Gillibrand’s New Efforts to Improve PTSD and TBI Treatment for New Veterans are as follows –

  1. Develop Coordination between Defense Department and VA

As the problems are persistent, the DOD has made huge steps to develop the screening and treatment of TBI within its systems. Be that as it may, these developments have not been implemented into a systematic methodology for veterans leaving active duty and entering VA care. For instance, the VA and DOD have no mutually interoperable meaning of what even constitutes TBI cases. This makes it hard to guarantee veterans are quickly getting successful treatment when they are shifted to the VA. Building up right ID of TBI is a basic to deliver the right treatment. A letter conveyed to Defense Secretary Robert Gates and VA Secretary Eric Shinseki, Senator Gillibrand has insisted on improving an integrated way to deal with recognizing and treating TBI. Also, he is worried over the dependence on a psychotropic solution to treat TBI, which has almost tripled. This has led the increase of around 100,000 prescriptions to more than 300,000, with no reasonable proof as to its viability.

  1. Implant Mental Health Providers with National Guard and Reserve Units

Guard and Reserve units have ended up being especially helpless to PTSD as an aftereffect of numerous deployments and the challenge to readapt to regular citizen life. The first four years in Iraq and Afghanistan over half of service members Guard and Reserve veterans have committed suicide. To offer a steady access to mental health treatment to the troops, Senator Gillibrand is making an enactment to implant a mental health professional to each Guard and Reserve unit to create the trust of troops and their families to recognize the onset of mental wounds. In light of a pilot program with the California National Guard, this step has been demonstrated to develop access to mental health treatment. Ultimately, it will lessen the stigma related with looking for help, just about multiplying the rate of Guard troops separately looking for mental help without a referral from a military facility or authority.

  1. Establish Long-Term Screening and Care

In the past few years, the DOD major progress in improving screening assessments to recognize PTSD upon the return of service members from the wars. Nevertheless, Senator Gillibrand has been notified by several veterans who have found that in view of the moderate onset of PTSD indications, a one-time screening upon come back from war is not generally sufficient to identify the problem. Therefore, he is keeping in touch with Charles L. Rice, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs and pushing to create suggestions on the most effective methods to identify the onsets of these illnesses like – by providing an extra screening 6 or 12 months after coming back from a battle.