A False Attack: Why and How the USA went to War against Iraq?

The Iraq war has a root back to the first Gulf War. Back then, Iraq had attacked next-door country Kuwait in 1990. But, a US-led coalition stopped Saddam Hussein’s armed force out of the nation in 1991. After that, the U.N. resolution, which finished the war, denied Iraq from having or delivering natural, chemical or atomic weapons. Also, Saddam declined to give U.N. weapons investigators free access as well. Following 12 years, the world leaders agonized over the likelihood that Saddam was creating, or had produced these weapons of mass destructions (WMDs).

After 9/11, President George W. Bush along with the members from his close circle has focused intensely on Saddam. Saddam himself, on the other hand, denied that he had WMDs and conveyed a feeling that he never possessed WMDs. (shortly before his execution, he told an F.B.I. questioner that he had done this to keep Iran from considering him to be weak and defenseless.

President Bush demanded that Saddam represented a danger to the security of the U.S. and the Middle East. In a broadcast message in 2003, the president gave Saddam a final proposal – leave Iraq or the U.S. military will assault Iraq and evacuate you. He also said that the US had has solid evidence that Saddam had WMDs, and that Iraq had supported, prepared and harbored al-Qaeda terrorists. To anticipate a future terrorist assault through chemical, biological or atomic weapons, the president said, they have every right to defend the attack by eliminating the terrorist threat.

The American armed forces invaded Iraq in 2003 (March 20th) and after one and half month, President Bush declared victory on May 1. In the wake of beating Saddam’s government, U.S. investigators discovered no sign of WMDs. They reasoned that Iraq had stopped adding to these weapons in 1991. No confirmation for an Iraq/al-Qaeda association ever surfaced, either; Saddam himself, in the F.B.I. meetings specified above, criticized Osama bin-Laden and disagree having any dealings with al-Qaeda.

Furthermore, the Bush administration had offered several justifications for the intrusion including Saddam’s history of human rights violation. Also, they provided details of his backing for terrorist groups (he offered rewards to the families of Palestinian suicide bombers).Critics have believed that Bush and his allies wanted to eliminate Saddam from power and depended on flawed evidence to legalized the invasion.

Arguments against the invasion

The US attack on Iraq was a controversial and questionable decision in recent American history. The critics have made the following arguments over the war:

  • To attack Iraq without the U.N’s. approval as we think Saddam may have WMDs, disregards international law.

 

  • Overthrowing Saddam may bring chaos in Iraq, which could destabilize an officially dangerous part in middle-east.

 

  • Invading Iraq without the backing of the international community will detach the U.S. also; make enemies for us, particularly in Islamic nations.
  • If we need to keep America safe from the individuals who might hurt us, then we should put our assets into eliminating Al-Qaeda. Iraq represents no prompt danger to us.

How many US Soldiers have died?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Defense setback site (May 29, 2012) 4,425 US soldiers have died (including both murdered in action and non-hostile) and 32,223 injured in activities (WIA) as a consequence of Operation Iraq Freedom.

American Military Casualties in Iraq
Date Total In Combat
American Deaths
Since war began (3/19/03): 4493 3528
Since “Mission Accomplished” (5/1/03) 4347 3424
Since Handover (6/29/04): 3627 2899
Since Obama Inauguration (1/20/09): 256 128
Since Operation New Dawn: 66 39
American Wounded Official Estimated
Total Wounded: 32021 Over 100000

Results of the invasion, in brief

By removing the atrocious regime of Saddam Hussein, the U.S. led coalition won the appreciation of numerous Iraqis. Not long after he was gone, nonetheless, Saddam supporters and religious radicals started to strike against American fighters. Chaos and fighting additionally broke out between Sunnis and Shiites, taking a huge number of lives. Regardless of proceeding with strains between distinctive groups, and progressing violence, Iraq now is by all accounts headed straight toward building up a functioning democratic government. But we don’t know what will happen once US forces leave the country!

Iraq War: Everything You Need to Know about!

The Iraq war started on March 19, 2003. Currently, it is the longest military clash of United States other than the Vietnam War. The Iraq war has taken somewhere in the range of 90,000 Iraqi lives. Besides, around 4,298 coalition troops has been died, among them, there are about 4,000 Americans. Also, the American citizens or taxpayers have paid nearly $700 billion and this war may cost up to $2 trillion if the war continues for another five years.

Significant Events of the war

  • On March 2003, about 300,000 American and British troops had attacked Iraq. Almost all the members from the U.N. have opposed the war. On May 1, the then President of US Bush declared victory over Iraq. But, there was violence against American soldiers and Iraqis who supported the war. Because of vulnerable security, robbers figure out how to take invaluable archeological relics from the National Museum in Baghdad. And a huge amount of explosives was stolen from an Iraqi weapons facility. The Iraqi Army had broken down and members from Saddam’s ruling Baath party were restricted from taking part in the government activities. In December, Saddam was found in a little subversive hideout.

 

  • In 2004, an interim constitution was approved. There were photos revealed abusing Iraqi detainees by American fighters in the Abu Ghraib jail. A furious adversary of American inclusion in Iraq, Shiite minister Moktada al-Sadr, drove an uprising against U.S. troops. As a result, the terrorist attacks occurred in every day.

 

  • In 2005, the first election in Iraq took place in over 50 years. The people of Iraq picked a National Assembly. In that election, all most all Sunnis decline to vote, and Shiites win a greater part of the vote. The “Bringing down Street Memo” surfaces – providing details regarding a 2002 meeting, the head of British Intelligence expresses that President Bush needed to uproot Saddam, and that the Bush administration influenced the evidence to start an invasion. Saddam Hussein goes on trial for wrongdoings against humankind.

 

  • In 2006, Nouri al-Maliki was elected as Prime Minister of Iraq. Abu Musab al Zarqawi, a pioneer of “Al Qaeda in Iraq,” was executed by American troops. Saddam Hussein is executed as well.

 

  • In 2007, on the insistence of General David Petraeus, who was the commander of U.S. forces in Iraq, US President Bush had provided an additional 30,000 troops to Iraq. “The surge” means to smother the aggression and help the rival groups to achieve a political settlement. The ongoing brutality of “al-Qaeda in Iraq” triggered a backfire, which is known as the Sunni Awakening. Almost 80,000 previous Sunni agitators betray Al-Qaeda and backed the new government.

 

  • 2008 The Iraqi government calls for the removal of U.S. troops by 2011.

 

  • In February 2009, newly elected U.S. President Barack Obama declared that American battle troops will leave Iraq by August 2010. However, around 50,000 soldiers will stay for advising and training the Iraqi security forces and thus, they will help with intelligence-gathering.

 

  • In August 2010, US President Obama declared that the American battle mission in Iraq has been finished.

Numbers involved with Iraq War

  • American soldiers murdered in Iraq: 4,487
  • American soldiers injured in Iraq: 32,226
  • Dollars spent (or affirmed to be spent) on the war, through 9/10: about $900 billion
  • Iraqi police and soldiers murdered: 9,381
  • Iraqi civilians murdered: assessments range from 50,000 to 600,000
  • Iraqi guerrillas slaughtered: around 55,000
  • Iraqi refugees who have left their home: more than 2.1 million (about 7% of the aggregate population)
  • Iraqi refugees inside Iraq: more than 2.2 million starting 2007

How has the Iraq War changed the course of the lives of Iraq People?

As indicated by the International Committee of the Red Cross (in 2007), “Civilians endured the worst part of the persistent brutality and the poor security conditions disrupt the lives and jobs of millions. Consistently, many individuals were murdered and numerous were injured. Shootings, bombings, snatchings, murders, military operations and different types of savagery are compelling a large number of individuals to escape their homes and look for security somewhere else in Iraq or in neighboring nations.” As of 2007, 25% of Iraqi children experienced endless chronic malnutrition. 40% of professionals had escaped from the nation and a lot of homes had electricity for just a couple of hours a day (starting 2007). And just 1/3 of homes had sewer system facilities.