Veteran Health Benefits: An Overview

Every enlisted veteran will receive Vas (Department of Veterans Affairs) complete medical benefits package. This package includes primary and specialty care, preventive, inpatient or outpatient care services along with diagnostic services. The veterans might be subjected to additional benefits comprising of dental care upon unique qualifications.

Compensation Benefits for Veterans

For service related injuries and illness, the VA provides a tax-free and financial compensation benefits which include disability compensation. These benefits might be rewarded to the survivors of veterans in specific circumstances. Applying for these benefits is easy. In March 2015, the VA presented new, streamlined eligibility and applying process. If any veteran is seeking for disability benefits, he or she should look out for advice on managing them in the FINRA publication.

Health Benefits for Veterans

A lot of veterans are qualified for extensive medical advantages, thanks to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Veterans Health Administration. These Health benefits include –

  • Inpatient and outpatient care at VA restorative offices and Prescriptions.
  • Health programs for dental care, substance misuse, long-term care, suicide counteractive action, and so on.
  • The new Veterans Choice Program permits qualified veterans to see non-VA specialists closer to home.

What psychological health resources does VA provide?

The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) offers a wide range of psychological health resources at its medical centers and community-based outpatient clinics. The services are:

  • Inpatient care and Residential care
  • Outpatient mental health care
  • Homelessness prevention programs
  • Programs for incarcerated veterans
  • Specialized posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) services
  • Military sexual trauma care
  • Psychosocial rehabilitation & recovery services
  • Substance use disorders programs
  • Suicide prevention programs
  • Violence prevention
  • Evidence-based psychotherapy programs
  • Mental health disaster response/post deployment activities

Program Contact Information

Recently, the VA has launched a website – My HealtheVet. This site is dedicated to veterans. The VA supports active duty Service members, Veterans, their dependents and caregivers to register in this site and make an account. Any individual who registers on My HealtheVet begins will have a Basic Account. This will give restricted access to features in My HealtheVet that you self-enter. The veterans can use the journals and different tools to track the health measures.

With a Basic Account a veteran may be able to use My HealtheVet to:

  • Include information to a personal health journal about over-the-counter medications, medical events, military health history, tests, and allergies.
  • Document and track personal information like contact information, health care providers and doctors, emergency contacts, and health insurance information.
  • Document and track personal health measurements (blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol, heart rate, body temperature, weight, pain level, etc.) in Vitals & Readings,
  • Print a wallet ID card with the personal information entered into the personal health record.

For any queries, a veteran is requested to:

  • Call at 1-877-222-VETS (8387)
  • Visit the Inquiry Routing & Information System(IRIS) website to look out and read the FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) section.
  • Call 1-800-829-4833, if you are hearing impaired.

How the US Plans to Improve the Treatment of Recent Veterans Suffering from PTSD & TBI?

Several veterans coming back from war have encountered Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) side effects. Senator Gillibrand has an exclusive plan to reinforce observing and treatment for men and women at work and new veterans. This authoritative plan concentrates on getting the organizations at the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Veterans Administration (VA) to facilitate all the treatment more adequately. They have to work seamlessly to address the problems related to mental health treatment. And they need to work tirelessly to upgraded the screening procedure and make it accessible to mental health providers.

Stanford University study revealed that PTSD and other mental diseases can affect upwards of 35% of all veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In spite of everything, there remains much more work to do to offer quality treatment to the PTSD and TBI affected service members and veterans.

According to RAND Corporation data, around 8,000 new veterans from NYC suffer from PSTD and more than 7,000 suffer from TBI. Also, over 4,000 suffer from both. The corporation also states that 20% of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans encounter PTSD, 19% suffer from TBI, and 75% is affected by both problems. Senator Gillibrand’s New Efforts to Improve PTSD and TBI Treatment for New Veterans are as follows –

  1. Develop Coordination between Defense Department and VA

As the problems are persistent, the DOD has made huge steps to develop the screening and treatment of TBI within its systems. Be that as it may, these developments have not been implemented into a systematic methodology for veterans leaving active duty and entering VA care. For instance, the VA and DOD have no mutually interoperable meaning of what even constitutes TBI cases. This makes it hard to guarantee veterans are quickly getting successful treatment when they are shifted to the VA. Building up right ID of TBI is a basic to deliver the right treatment. A letter conveyed to Defense Secretary Robert Gates and VA Secretary Eric Shinseki, Senator Gillibrand has insisted on improving an integrated way to deal with recognizing and treating TBI. Also, he is worried over the dependence on a psychotropic solution to treat TBI, which has almost tripled. This has led the increase of around 100,000 prescriptions to more than 300,000, with no reasonable proof as to its viability.

  1. Implant Mental Health Providers with National Guard and Reserve Units

Guard and Reserve units have ended up being especially helpless to PTSD as an aftereffect of numerous deployments and the challenge to readapt to regular citizen life. The first four years in Iraq and Afghanistan over half of service members Guard and Reserve veterans have committed suicide. To offer a steady access to mental health treatment to the troops, Senator Gillibrand is making an enactment to implant a mental health professional to each Guard and Reserve unit to create the trust of troops and their families to recognize the onset of mental wounds. In light of a pilot program with the California National Guard, this step has been demonstrated to develop access to mental health treatment. Ultimately, it will lessen the stigma related with looking for help, just about multiplying the rate of Guard troops separately looking for mental help without a referral from a military facility or authority.

  1. Establish Long-Term Screening and Care

In the past few years, the DOD major progress in improving screening assessments to recognize PTSD upon the return of service members from the wars. Nevertheless, Senator Gillibrand has been notified by several veterans who have found that in view of the moderate onset of PTSD indications, a one-time screening upon come back from war is not generally sufficient to identify the problem. Therefore, he is keeping in touch with Charles L. Rice, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs and pushing to create suggestions on the most effective methods to identify the onsets of these illnesses like – by providing an extra screening 6 or 12 months after coming back from a battle.

Lack of Care or Improper Treatment: A Special Report on US military veterans

Since the Vietnam War, the Iraq and Afghanistan wars are the longest wars that the US military committed to, especially, more than 2.2 million troops were sent to the fight. This has resulted in more than 6,600 deaths and 48,000 injuries. A lot of service members have returned home unharmed and talked about rewarding experiences. However, the others have come back with different complex health conditions and find that life at home is not easy to adjust; meeting with the family, looking for some kind of employment, or coming back to school is a continuous battle. The demands to mitigate these health, monetary, and social issues are elevated by the amount of people affected. The quick withdrawal of military work force from Iraq and Afghanistan, and the long haul impacts for veterans, service members, their families, and the country.

A few years back, the IOM had requested to conduct a study on veterans‘ physical and emotional well-being. And in addition, other readjustment needs. Now, this report exhibits the IOM’s exhaustive evaluation of the physical, mental, social, and monetary impacts of the delegation on service members, their families, veterans, and their communities.

Key Conclusion of the Report

The DOD (Department of Defense) and the VA (Veterans Affairs) are trying to accomplish more to survey the feasibility and sufficiency of treatment, particularly if it is offered nationally. The tools that are used to evaluate cognitive function after a brain injury has “no reasonable scientific base” and the “Acknowledgment and Commitment” treatment utilized by the VA for depression “needs adequate experimental proof to back its utilization as a first line medication”, it said.

  • Independent research reveals that carrying lethal weapons stop suicides but the report figured out that regardless of the fact that a service member is at danger for suicide. However, the DOD denies limiting any possession of privately owned weapons. Half of the 300 military suicides that occurred in 2010 were deployed in the Iraq and Afghanistan clashes. According to a VA report, around 22 veterans commit suicide every day.

 

  • The report suggests that the DOD and VA should “extend its meaning of family” to incorporate unmarried partners, single parents, same-sex couples, and stepfamilies.

 

  • The report also said that the DOD and VA should work in tandem to integrate their respective databases to allow sharing information to keep track of issues of affected personnel exclusively. A big amount of relevant information can use to answer key questions about re-adjustment. These are collected by different federal departments and agencies to analyze and answer the questions of different problems at hand.

 

  • The DOD priority should be to reduce domestic violence and combat the troubling rise in domestic violence of service members.

 

  • This report was around 500-page and it found out that about 44% troops coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan reported problems. One out of five encounters PTSD, while a comparative number have a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). Some others have overlapping health issues, most usually PTSD, depression, substance use disorder, and side effects identified with mild TBI. It also noticed that the unemployment of veterans from 18 to 24 was more than 30%, which is contrasted with 16% for regular citizens.

So, this report clearly shows that there has been a lack of care or improper treatment of veterans. They should be handled with care and subtle treatment to overcome these problems. Otherwise, it would be a shame for the entire nation!