How has the Afghanistan War been ended?

After the 9/11 attack, the US and Afghanistan have joined forces together to react to the dangers to global peace and security. Also, they are working to offer the Afghan some assistance in securing a democratic prosperous future. After taking charge, President Obama along with NATO associates have sought after a focused strategy to fortify the Afghanistan’s security strengths and government to assume full responsibility for their nation’s future while they have taken critical actions against al-Qaida’s administration and kept Afghanistan from being utilized to dispatch assaults against the US.

Bringing Back the Soldiers to the US

In December 2009, the president declared the troop surge at West Point. The conditions that permitted them to push back the Taliban and develop Afghan forces. He also announced in 2009 that they had finished the surge and would start bringing back the soldiers from Afghanistan from a peak of 100,000 troops. He coordinated that troop decreases continue at a consistent interval. And it should be done in an arranged, facilitated, and responsible way. Subsequently, 10,000 troops got back home before that year’s over, and 33,000 got back home by the mid-year of 2012. In February 2013, The President reported in the State of the Union address that they would bring another 34,000 American troops from Afghanistan within a year – which they have done properly.

After that, the President has announced a plan in which another 22,000 troops will return home before the year has over, ultimately, ending the U.S. battle mission in December 2014. From the start of 2015, a partnership agreement between the US and Afghanistan will be started. Also, the Afghans will sign a Bilateral Security Agreement and a status of forces agreement with NATO. It will allow putting 9,800 U.S. service members in different parts of the country. Besides, before the end of 2015, the US will reduce their presence to half, which will result in a consolidation of troops in Kabul and on Bagram Airfield. In 2016, the US will open an embassy in Kabul with security assistance component similar to Iraq.

Afghanistan is Responsible for its Security

Afghanistan and International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) countries agreed upon a proposal to shift full responsibility for Afghanistan’s security to the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) by the end of 2014. This proposal took place at the 2010 NATO Summit in Lisbon. This agreement has permitted the international community to draw down their powers in Afghanistan. In the same time, it has kept the hard-won gains and set the stage to achieve the fundamental objectives such as supporting Afghan Security Forces, disrupting threats posed by al-Qaida, and providing the chance to Afghan people to succeed as they stand on their own.

During the 2012 NATO Summit in Chicago, the ISAF countries and Afghanistan had reaffirmed this system for a move and they also gave consent to the point of reference in mid-2013 would start to transit from combat to support. The Afghans came to that turning point as the ANSF expected the lead for security over the entire of Afghanistan and the coalition powers moved their concentration to the training, advising and helping of Afghan forces.

Political Evolution

Since Afghanistan had taken the control of their security, they made strives to initiate a shift of power in the country. The presidential election was held and millions of Afghans voted in the election. The US has confirmed its backing for a reasonable, trustworthy, and Afghan-drove election preparation and does not support any hopeful candidate who is keen for own interest.

Economic Evolution

Afghanistan has encountered a rapid financial development and wonderful enhancements in key social pointers –

  • Afghanistan’s total national output has grown a mean of 9.4% for every year from 2003 to 2012.

 

  • In the most recent decade, life expectancy at birth has improved by 20 years to more than 62 years.

 

  • In 2002, an expected 900,000 young boys enrolled into school and no girls. Presently, there are 8 million students selected in school, more than 33% of whom are young girls.

 

  • In 2002, just 6% of Afghans had reliable electricity. Today, 28% of the total population has electricity, including more than 2 million people in Kabul who have access to electricity 24-hour a day.

Be that as it may, difficulties remain, and Afghanistan will need international support to maintain its stability and to achieve objectives.

Afghanistan War: A Brief Profile

In 2001, the Afghanistan war had started after 9/11. The US and NATO coalition joined forces to attack Taliban and Al Qaeda groups. Starting 2014, United States workforces are pulling themselves back from the nation, finishing a decade long battle. The US has been at war for almost the first decade of the 21st-century. A big number of US military personnel have been sent to another country to the Middle East to take part in what the administration of President George W. Bush indicated to as the ‘War on Terror.’ In numerous ways, the main battle of the War on Terror has occurred in the isolated and hilly country of Afghanistan. So, let’s take a brief tour to the longest war in the history of US.

Causes of the War

Afghanistan has been an unsteady country, especially over the last century. In the early 1900s, the country had established itself as a sovereign country that no longer need outside help. In the early 1970s, power shifts hand at a random pace, especially, from one group to another. A civil war within Afghanistan’s border had begun in 1978 and the parties involved were pro- and anti-communist forces. The Soviet Union sent in a military group to show support to the communists. As a result, a severe conflict started. Throughout this battle, the US gave cash and military help to those battling the Soviets. Some of these were known as the Mujahideen, made out of Islamists who were staunchly contradicted to the Soviet intrusion. Throughout this conflict, more than one million Afghans had passed on this contention, yet the Soviets were repelled.

Following the war against the Soviets, different warlords and extremist groups viewed Afghanistan as a weak link and they strive to take control over the country in the coming years. By the mid-1990s, the Taliban took control of the nation and they ruled by Islamic Sharia law. They also initiated to a great degree unforgiving restrictions on the citizens of this nation. Furthermore, the Taliban group had made a situation in Afghanistan that feed terrorists. Osama Bin Laden, a veteran of the battle against the Soviets, turned into a main figure in the Al Qaeda terrorist association, one of the biggest and most advanced Islamic terrorist groups on the planet. They operated within Afghanistan and they had planned to strike against the USA.

In the year 2011, the Al Qaeda terrorists group started attacks against the USA and they flew with two planes filled with innocent people and crashed into buildings in New York City and one into the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. The brave passengers in Southern Pennsylvania had brought down the fourth plane. About 3,000 Americans were killed during these terrorists’ attacks.

How many have died in this war?

  • S. soldiers: 2,014 (as of 7/10/12, according to the Department of Defense)
  • Taliban: More than 30,000
  • Al-Qaeda: more than 2,500
  • Afghan government forces: 6,100
  • Afghan civilians: more than 34,000
  • British soldiers: 341
  • Canadian soldiers: 152
  • Soldiers from allied countries (mostly from Germany, Spain, France, and Denmark): 163

Why was it so hard to achieve positive goals against the Afghanistan?

  • The Afghan society is made of different tribes and ethnic groups. They have a history of conflict and rivalry. As a result, it is a difficult task to bring them into one government supervision.
  • The mountain terrains of this county provide several hiding places to insurgents and make traditional war an impossible task.
  • Despite the fact that the USA had no plans of making a colony in the country, the conventional Afghan brutality worked against them.